Lecture-Performance & Film screening: Gluklya

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Gluklya (Natalia Pershina-Yakimanskaya), who lives and works between St Petersburg and Amsterdam, is considered as one of the pioneers of Russian performance.

In 1996, she co-founded the artists' collective The Factory of Found Clothes (FFC), which uses installation, performance, video, text and social research to explore the concept of ‘fragility’ and relationships between the internal and external, private and public. In 2012 FFC was reformulated to the Utopian Unemployment Union, a project that united art, social sciences and progressive pedagogy allowing people from different backgrounds to meet and make art together. Since 2003, Gluklya has also been a co-founder and active member of the group Chto Delat? (What Is to Be Done?).  

In Multiculti (2014), Gluklya interviews the inhabitants of the infamous Bijlmer neighbourhood, in the Southeast of Amsterdam. Once an embodiment of the belief in the role of architecture in social reform, today’s Bijlmer deals with the lack of sense of ownership and involvement of its residents in relation to their living environment, the city. Aiming to facilitate civil self-organization, Gluklya initiated ‘The Moving Museum of Clothes’, which proposed a new institutional format built on, with and for individuals and their stories.
 
Gluklya approaches clothing as a second skin that is able to bridge the conflict between one’s personality and society, which is further elaborated in the performance Debates of Division: When the Private Becomes Public (2014). She is particularly interested in clothing that performs an act of estrangement [ostranenie], in the sense explored by Brecht and Shklovsky, and thereby has the potential to provoke different perspectives. 
 
Programme
 
Triumph of Fragility, 2002, 5:17 mins
Multiculti: Hasti + Priscilla, 2014, 9:04 mins
Debates of Division: When the Private Becomes Public, 2014, 18:19 mins
Garden of Vigilant Clothes, 2015, 4:07 mins
 
02.07.2017, 16:00
In English
Free with entrance ticket
Film programme (without exhibition): 5€